LEADERSHIP: WHERE THERE IS VISION, THERE IS A FUTURE.

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reprints 

 

Our extensive library of research papers is a unique part of Levinson and Co.’s heritage.  Currently available are a number of reprints designed to inform and invite further discussion. 

To receive a complimentary copy of one of our reprints, just quote the code RPRNT when you contact us:

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“Accountability Leadership,” The Systems Thinker, Pegasus Communications

This is an abstract of chapter 1 of Accountability Leadership by Dr. Gerry Kraines, CEO and president of Levinson and Co.  It provides a fresh and thought-provoking perspective of what accountability is really all about.

 

“Leadership: The Critical Difference in Business Management,” The Consultant

Dr. Harry Levinson, founder of The Levinson Institute, sums up his perspectives on the six critical distinctions between leadership and management.

 

 “Making the Case for Strategic Organization,” The Levinson Institute

This white paper provides an overview of the fundamental tenets of Strategic Organization, based on the prodigious amount of organizational and managerial development work done by Dr. Gerry Kraines and other Levinson consultants.

 

 “Strategic Organization Imperatives,” The Levinson Institute

This is an edited transcript of a major speech Dr. Gerry Kraines delivered to Argentina’s top 200 CEOs and business leaders.

 

 “The Team Troubles That Won’t Go Away,” Training

Dr. Gerry Kraines, CEO of Levinson and Co., argues that the fundamental flaw in the way most business organizations approach teamwork is that they attempt to overlook the issue of accountability. 

THE LEVINSON LETTER REDUX

Long before blogs were conceived of in the late 1990s, there was The Levinson Letter.  Created in 1974 by Levinson Institute founder, Dr. Harry Levinson, The Levinson Letter encapsulates Dr. Levinson’s perspectives and teachings in an entertaining and informal style.  Originally designed and intended for busy managers, nuggets of wisdom from the Levinson archive are captured in the following articles taken directly or adapted from the Letter.  They are republished in the belief that the contents are as enlightening and relevant today as when they were originally written.

The following condensed versions of The Levinson Letter are available when you contact us. Please quote the following code LEVLET to receive your requested Levinson Letter at no cost:

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“The Casualties of Change”

As we teach in our On Leadership course, the effectiveness of implementing a plan for change requires the acceptance and ownership of that plan by employees.  You will discover, though, that even with the best plan and best intentions, you will usually find some employees who have difficulty accepting change. 

 

“Feedback to Subordinates”

Information is the necessary stimulus for transformation and change in business organizations.  The best—and most useful—information can only come through deliberate and regular feedback.

 

“Is It Personal or Is It Business?”

Managers are accountable for ensuring subordinates are carrying their weight in their roles.  However, this accountability requires a simultaneous awareness and understanding of the ongoing people-business conundrum.

 

“A Key to Productivity”

This essay introduces the systems approach (that we teach at each On Leadership <link to MENU BUTTON INSTITUTE/ drop down On Leadership> session) to understanding human motivation and how it relates in tangible ways to the world of work.  

 

“Managing Professionals”

This thoughtful article points out that successful management of professionals is just a special case of successful management of any group within an organization.

 

“The Missing Link: Accountability on the Shop Floor”

Typical shift management breaks the “linked chain” of managerial authority and accountability.  This article lays out how to alleviate this common and vexing problem. 

 

“The Three R’s of Change”

Changing continuously is inherently stressful; but almost everyone gets used to changing, and accommodating to the stress.  The challenge is to recover, refocus, and regenerate—the three Rs of change.